“A joke-filled debate!

An old Jew of Moses’ tribe shuffles onto a set that evokes “Godot”—some boulders and a scraggly tree—soon followed by a fellow-wanderer. Lou, a cynic, and Bud, patient, hopeful, and faithful, have been thirty years in the desert together. Bud trusts in Moses and believes in the promised land. So begins a joke-filled debate on subjects theological and mundane, ranging from the Ten Commandments to dietary laws and beyond. After a pause, the players return as Marty and Phil, strangers but basically the same guys, a few thousand years later. The talk turns to health, Heaven, family, and, again, faith. The writer, Ed. Weinberger, has been concocting quality comedy since the sixties. 

  — Ken Marks, The New Yorker

"I HAD A BLAST. IT WAS A LOT OF FUN!

There’s something special happening at the Theater at St. Clement’s right now:

A kind of 'Waiting for Godot' meets 'The 2000 Year Old Man!'
 —This Week in New York: An Insider's Guide to Arts & Culture 

I found it funnier than the 2000 year old man!

Jewish humor has been woven inextricably into American culture. Veteran television writer, Ed. Weinberger, mines laughs and poignance from anecdotes and observations that carry a resonance beyond its punch lines. I found it funnier than the 2000 year old man.”

—Elysa Gardner, NY Sun

“SIDESPLITTING!
Thanks to Dan Wackerman’s skillful direction, the irony, beauty, funny,

even sidesplitting moments of Weinberger’s script, avoids settling for caricatures.
—Rachel S. Kovacs, OffOff Online


 “A TOUR DE FORCE FOR TWO VETERAN ACTORS! 
If Samuel Beckett had been a Jew, Waiting for Godot's Estragon and Vladimir could have emerged

as the equally quirky Two Jews, Talking, the appealing new two-hander by Ed. Weinberger. 

—Joel Benjamin, TheaterScene.net 

“Clever one-liners and pungent punch lines.”

Calls to mind Waiting for Godot: the subject matter may not be all that different, though the method of expression certainly is. Weinberger offers some clever one-liners pungent punch lines on themes that deepen in the play's final moments.” 

—Diane Snyder, Theatermania

“THE JOKES LAND!—
how could they not with these two!”

—Suzanna Bowling, Times Square Chronicles


“The chance to see two veteran actors hold court over an enraptured, sold-out  audience, 

from the moment they step on stage.”

Judd Hollander, The Epoch Times

"IN A WORD, FUNNY!

A COMEDY MASTER CLASS.”

–Karen Nowossad, Let's Go To The Theater